Web 2.0

Socrative

1.  Brief Description- what is the site?  What is it supposed to do?

  • This site allows teachers to make quizzes, exit tickets, really any sort of assessment.

2.  What standards (NETS-S or content) could using this site help to achieve?

  • I think this is a number 4, critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making, because the student have to think about the answers.

3.  Prerequisites- what do you need to know before using the site?

  • A teacher needs to know how to make quizzes and has to know a bit about the site because of the so many features the teacher can use. For students they just need to know the content (;

4.  Strengths- good things that the site does (high interest for students, superior technical quality, bias free)

  • This site has awesome options for the teacher and engaging/attention-holding graphics and layout. It is very easy to understand.

5.  Limitations- perhaps the reading level is too high, maybe user guide is not very clear or organized

  • I’m not sure about any limitations. I really like the site.

6.  Best guess on age group/grade level the site is intended for.

  • Grade level is probably high elementary and up.

Chirbit

1.  Brief Description- what is the site?  What is it supposed to do?

  • This site is used for podcasts.

2.  What standards (NETS-S or content) could using this site help to achieve?

  • I think this goes with number 2, communication and collaboration.

3.  Prerequisites- what do you need to know before using the site?

  • You have to know what a podcast is and how to make one. You also have to know how to use tags.

4.  Strengths- good things that the site does (high interest for students, superior technical quality, bias free)

  • It would probably have a high interest rate with teenagesr because anything goes.

5.  Limitations- perhaps the reading level is too high, maybe user guide is not very clear or organized

  • Every time you click on something it goes into a weird side screen for a second then back to the regular site. Also it’s not very interesting to me, not is it used very much so it seems.

6.  Best guess on age group/grade level the site is intended for.

  • Probably for high school and up.

Symbaloo

1.  Brief Description- what is the site?  What is it supposed to do?

  • This site helps you organize all the websites that are useful for you. They are easy to click on and brings you straight to the site you needed. you can also organize them in tabs, such as you can make a “Teacher” Tab and put all the useful websites for a teacher there.

2.  What standards (NETS-S or content) could using this site help to achieve?

  • I think it could help standards 5, Digital Citizenship.

3.  Prerequisites- what do you need to know before using the site?

  • You need to know how to use the computer, such as clicking and typing. There is a video introducing the site that shows you how to use it.

4.  Strengths- good things that the site does (high interest for students, superior technical quality, bias free)

  • I think this is much more of a site for teachers or adults, but it can also appeal to kids that want to orginize their websites too. I absolutely love it, it will help me because I only have to remember this site instead of tons of them.

5.  Limitations- perhaps the reading level is too high, maybe user guide is not very clear or organized

  • When you first get to the site it seems kind of cluttered, but once you get your eyes adjusted to the format and what is happening it becomes very exciting and fun to use.

6.  Best guess on age group/grade level the site is intended for.

  • Probably for high school and adults.

Overexposed: Sexting and Relationships

  • How does Ms. Penland approach teaching a sensitive topic?

Ms. Penland first tells the students that the topic they will be talking about involves their digital life instead of their school life, which can get a student’s attention because we all love our phones ad social medias. Then she proceeds to tell the class that the topic is a very sensitive topic and asks the students to “use their mature and leadership skills” when talking abut the topic, which complements the students and makes them want to express those qualities.

  • Why is it helpful for students to put vocabulary in their own words?

It is helpful for students to put vocab in their own words because it helps them remember it. It is much harder to remember something someone else said rather than something you said, so defining something in your own words also helps you learn it.

  • How does the use of iPads affect participation?

IPads seem to make the students become more engaged in the activity. The students are able to write their answers and then show it without being embarrassed that they might be wrong or their peers will laugh at them. “…giving everyone the chance to communicate on a topic that maybe they wouldn’t feel comfortable doing so”

 

 

Overexposed: Sexting and Relationships. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19, 2016, from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/dangers-of-sexting

 

 

Copyright 101

  • What copyright means

Copyright means the original owner of the material has all “copy rights” to it. Which means without permission you cannot copy the material and violate laws, such as copying a whole text book for each one of your students instead of buying the textbook.

  • What the four tests for fair use involves

Specific guidelines.

The purpose and character of the use. Will the materials be used non- commercially in a nonprofit education institution?

The nature of the work being copied. Is the work published or unpublished? Is it factual or creative? Unpublished works have stronger protections than do published works. Although facts cannot be protected, the expression of those facts may be.

The amount of the work being used. Are you using a little, a lot, or all of a work? The more you use, the less likely that the use is fair.

The effect of your use on the market for or value of the work being copied. What would happen if everyone were to do what you are proposing? Would you deprive the copyright owner of a sale or harm the value in other ways? If you have any commercial intent, even if the money goes to a good cause, harm to the market is assumed (Crews, 2000).1 

  • Why the type of media involved matters

There are specific guidelines for different medias too. A multimedia vs a video game are two different things with two different copyright laws.

 

 

 

“Presentation Design: Principles and Techniques”

I liked this chapter very much. It gave me some incite on what to do in my power points that I may not have known before. As well as the chapter is useful to my future students because if they follow these elements it will make for easy and smooth grading.

1. What elements were you already aware of?  Which elements were you not aware of?

I think I have been aware of many of the elements but it was never something I knew. It was more of a trial and error sort of thing I have figured out by the many presentations I have given that… frankly… were just bad. With this trial and error sort of method I developed I got to mess around with PowerPoint a lot, which allowed me to look as something and say “that doesn’t look right” or “That looks SO COOL!!”. Although I may was aware of the elements I do not think I knew any of them.

 2.  How can you incorporate this into your own work and that of your students?  Why is it important?  

This can be incorporated by all students and all teachers because we present. At some point in our lives we will present a power point with slides, and knowing how to create and design these slides to keep an audience’s attention can be very useful (and not to mention easier to grade). Using the elements stated in the article are some great ways to create a fun and interesting presentation.
3.  How do the Power Points that you have created over the years fit (or not fit) with these design principles?  You may also want to take a look at this blog posting on dodging presentation fatigue.

Many of the design principles fit into the power points I have done. I have used a lot of pictures, in fact one of my teachers once required only pictures. Along with not fitting into these principles, I have done many cluttered presentations, which made for a boring presentation for both me and my audience.

“True or Not?”

This article talked a lot about finding the original source, and sure, that is awesome to find the credibility of the original source but do students really have time for this, or even the interest? I don’t think students have the time to search and search to find the original author to check about credible information, but if we create, like the article said, rules of thumbs, it can be very easy for a student to understand and find a reliable source.

1.  Can we define what it means to be information literate?

To be information literate means to know when to evaluate information and when you need information.

2.  Can we teach our students to have the skills essential to information literacy?

I believe that WE can teach our students to have these essential skills, as a whole, as they grow up, but I do not think one teacher or even just two teachers can do it alone. Teaching information literacy seems like a hard task for one teacher to take on, and anyways, if a student is only getting taught this in one class or for one year how much will they really hold on to? We need to continue to teach information literacy throughout a student’s education, just like we do with Math, Science and English.


3.  Can we truly prepare students to be effective users of the most powerful medium?

I don’t think I have enough information on this subject of ‘the most powerful medium’ to answer this question. To be honest I just do not know.

Digital Natives and Critical Thinking.

In recent discussions of digital natives vs. digital immigrants, a controversial issue has been whether children are digital natives and adult are digital immigrants.  On the one hand, some argue that the terms give false expectation.  From this perspective, students do not know everything about technology, and we need to learn more about it to teach those children, because they aren’t digital natives.  On the other hand, however, others argue that students grow up knowing technology and have changed the way they learn.  According to this view, digital natives (students) are not engaged in old ways of learning and need digital immigrants (teachers) to learn more and find new ways to help students learn.  In sum then, the issues is whether students are in need of learning technology or whether they are already technological savvy and need new ways to learn.

          My own view is that students are technologically savvy but still need some direction.  Though I concede that many adults do not know as much as children about technology, I still maintain that children need help to find ways to use the internet to it’s full capacity.  For example, I am what you would call a “digital native” but I still don’t understand how to use certain programs.    Although some might object that students nee no  help with technology they have already grown up closely with, I would reply that they may have grown up with it, but just like English natives, we still go to school to take English.  The issue is important because it revolves around the way we teach and treat the incoming students in our education system.